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King Crimson, 'In the Court of the Crimson King'

In the Court of the Crimson King  (1969,  43.54)  *****/TTTTT

21st Century Schizoid Man
I Talk to the Wind
Epitaph
Moonchild
The Court of the Crimson King
King Crimson, 'In the Wake of Poseidon'

In the Wake of Poseidon  (1970,  41.10)  ****/TTT½

Peace - a Beginning
Pictures of a City
Cadence and Cascade
In the Wake of Poseidon
Cat Food
The Devil's Triangle
  Merday Morn
  Hand of Sceiron
  Garden of Worm

Peace - an End
King Crimson, 'Lizard'

Lizard  (1970,  41.28)  ***/TTTT

Cirkus
Indoor Games

Happy Family
Lady of the Dancing Water
Lizard
  Prince Rupert Awakes
  Bolero - the Peacock's Tale
  The Battle of Glass Tears
  Big Top
King Crimson, 'Islands'

Islands  (1971,  40.35)  ***/TT½

Formentera Lady
Sailor's Tale
The Letters
Ladies of the Road
Prelude: Song of the Gulls
Islands
King Crimson, 'Earthbound'

Earthbound  (1972,  45.10)  **½/T

21st Century Schizoid Man
Peoria
The Sailors Tale
Earthbound
Groon
King Crimson, 'Larks' Tongues in Aspic'

Larks' Tongues in Aspic  (1973,  46.46)  *****/TTT

Larks' Tongues in Aspic, Part One
Book of Saturday
Exiles
Easy Money

The Talking Drum
Larks' Tongues in Aspic, Part Two
King Crimson, 'Starless and Bible Black'

Starless and Bible Black  (1974,  46.47)  ****/TTTT

The Great Deceiver
Lament
We'll Let You Know
The Night Watch
Trio
The Mincer
Starless and Bible Black

Fracture
King Crimson, 'Red'

Red  (1974,  40.09)  ****½/TTTT

Red
Fallen Angel
One More Red Nightmare
Providence
Starless
King Crimson, 'USA'

USA  (1975,  41.04/67.18)  *****/TTT½ (TTTT½)

Larks' Tongues in Aspic, Part II
Lament
Exiles
Asbury Park
Easy Money

21st Century Schizoid Man
[CD adds:
Fracture
Starless
]
King Crimson, 'The Great Deceiver'

The Great Deceiver  (1992, recorded 1973-74,  295.25)  ****½/TTTTT

(Walk on... No Pussyfooting)
Larks' Tongues in Aspic, Part Two
Lament
Exiles
Improv - A Voyage to the
  Centre of the Cosmos
Easy Money
Improv - Providence
Fracture
Starless

21st Century Schizoid Man
(Walk Off From Providence... No
  Pussyfooting)
Sharks' Lungs in Lemsip
Larks' Tongues in Aspic, Part One
Book of Saturday
Easy Money
We'll Let You Know
The Night Watch
Improv - Tight Scrummy
Peace - a Theme
Cat Food
Easy Money
...It is for You, But Not for Us

(Walk on... No Pussyfooting)
The Great Deceiver
Improv - Bartley Butsford
Exiles

Improv - Daniel Dust
The Night Watch
Doctor Diamond
Starless
Improv - Wilton Carpet
The Talking Drum
Larks' Tongues in Aspic, Part
  Two
(Applause & Announcement)
Improv - Is There Life Out There?
Improv - The Golden Walnut
The Night Watch
Fracture
Improv - Clueless and Slightly
  Slack

(Walk on... No Pussyfooting)
Improv - Some Pussyfooting
Larks' Tongues in Aspic, Part One
Improv - The Law of Maximum
  Distress, Part One

Improv - The Law of Maximum
  Distress, Part Two
Easy Money
Improv - Some More
  Pussyfooting

The Talking Drum
King Crimson, 'THRAK'

THRAK  (1995,  56.39)  ****/TT½

VROOOM
Coda: Marine 475
Dinosaur
Walking on Air
B'Boom
THRAK
Inner Garden I
People
Radio I
One Time
Radio II
Inner Garden II
Sex Sleep Eat Drink Dream
VROOOM VROOOM
VROOOM VROOOM: Coda
King Crimson, 'Epitaph - Live 1969'

Epitaph - Live 1969  (1997, recorded 1969,  123.34/241.59)  ****/TTTT½

21st Century Schizoid Man
In the Court of the Crimson King
Get Thy Bearings
Epitaph
A Man, a City
Epitaph
21st Century Schizoid Man
Mantra
Travel Weary Capricorn
Improv - Travel Bleary Capricorn
Mars
In the Court of the Crimson King
Drop in
A Man, a City
Epitaph

21st Century Schizoid Man
Mars
21st Century Schizoid Man
Get Thy Bearings
In the Court of the Crimson King
Mantra

Travel Weary Capricorn
Improv
  By the Sleeping Lagoon
Mars

21st Century Schizoid Man
Drop in
Epitaph
Get Thy Bearings
Mantra

Travel Weary Capricorn
Improv
Mars

King Crimson, 'The Night Watch'

The Night Watch  (1997, recorded 1973,  84.46)  *****/TTTT½

Easy Money
Lament

Book of Saturday
Fracture
The Night Watch
Improv: Starless and Bible Black
Improv: Trio
Exiles
Improv: The Fright Watch
The Talking Drum

Larks' Tongues in Aspic (Part II)
21st Century Schizoid Man

Current availability:

Mellotrons used:

In 1968, a trio of young men from Dorset snappily named Giles, Giles and Fripp recorded a rather strange album called The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp. Possibly the first album ever recorded by a firm of solicitors (?!), it's best described as psychedelic vaudeville, sounding vaguely like a cross between The Bonzo Dog Band and Sgt. Pepper. 'Of its time', is, I believe, the expression. Surprisingly, one of its less notable features is the presence of a Mellotron on a few tracks, apparently played by Robert Fripp himself.

Crimson 1969, from 'Live at the Marquee' (note Robert standing!)

King Crimson were, of course, many older listeners' route into the world of the Mellotron, along with the Moody Blues. Crimson formed in early 1969 from the ashes of the previous band, with their initial lineup consisting of Robert Fripp on guitar, Greg Lake (later the 'L' of ELP, of course) on bass and vocals, Michael Giles on drums, the multi-talented Ian McDonald and Peter Sinfield on 'words and illumination', presumably both the visual and spiritual varieties. Fripp obviously hadn't forgotten using a Mellotron the previous year, and Crimson purchased a MkII, to be played by McDonald when he wasn't playing sax or flute. Fripp is rumoured to have contributed 'Tron to the line-up's sole album, but there is no actual evidence to back this up (see interview segment further down).

After gigging for a few months, they were signed by Island through their production company, EG, later to cause the band no end of trouble, and they wasted no time in recording In the Court of the Crimson King. From its terrifying cover in, this is a stunning debut album; five tracks, three of which have become absolute classics with Crimson (or 'Crimso' to aficionados) fans. 21st Century Schizoid Man should need no introduction whatsoever, with its roaring guitar and squalling saxes, closely followed by the pastoral I Talk To The Wind, a gentle hippy throwback with drifting flutes and 'hello trees, hello flowers' lyrics. As it fades, an ominous rumble of tympani heralds the awesome power of Epitaph, one of the finest progressive pieces ever, not to mention an enduring Mellotron Classic. This track makes the album worth buying on its own, featuring a staggering overdubbed 'Tron section in the middle with one of the best examples of Mellotron pitchbend ever. Moonchild starts as another pastoral ballad, but shifts into eight minutes of rather unfocused improv, but it ends on a high note with the classic The Court Of The Crimson King, with more swathes of 'Tron. Ripping. Unsurprisingly, the classic 'strings' patch (three violins, to be irritatingly exact) is the most heavily used, and remained so throughout the first phase of the band's career. Despite Ian McDonald's fine flute playing, the band obviously wanted the polyphony of the Mellotron flutes on Moonchild (the 'song' part, before the fairly excruciating eight or nine minutes of improvisation). Interestingly, on 1991's Frame by Frame box set, Fripp included almost the entire album on the first disc, but faded Moonchild before the improv section. Good move, Robert...

Incidentally, there's an amusing anecdote doing the rounds concerning the apparently pretentious 'subsections' of all but one of the songs on the album. After being derided for years on the issue, the truth leaked out: due to the bizarre reckoning of album royalties in the States, all releases are judged on the 'ten tracks' rule, which appears to penalise acts whose albums contain less than this optimum number! (Don't ask; I haven't got a clue why anyone would invent such a patently ludicrous system). I've no idea how they treat albums with more than ten tracks... Anyway, as Crimson's first only contained five pieces, they invented some completely spurious 'subtitles' for four of them to ensure they got their full share of royalties. Truth sometimes is stranger than fiction... This doesn't, by the way, excuse the overall album's subtitle, 'An Observation By King Crimson'. I suppose it was 1969...

The band gigged heavily, picking up a good following at home and abroad; their MkII was a familiar sight at gigs, being used on various songs that remained unofficially recorded, as well as on the improvisations that were already becoming a staple of their live sets. One piece in particular was entirely based around it; their adaptation of Holst's Mars (from his Planets suite), varying in length from night to night, consisted of guitar, bass and drums holding down the 5/4 rhythm, while the 'Tron provided all the harmonic and melodic content, ending with McDonald running his hand up and down the keyboard with considerable gusto. The effect is cataclysmic, sounding like the Mellotron is about to explode. Unbelievably, no version of this track was officially available until the Frame By Frame box set in 1991. 1997's Epitaph box provides several versions for the connoisseur. According to Fripp (in the Epitaph sleeve notes), the band ended up using two, then three MkIIs in the States, due to reliability problems. One of these extra machines is rumoured (again!) to have been sold to Genesis a year or two later, from whence it was sold to UK band England in the mid-'70s, although I'm not at all sure about the veracity of this one.

Unfortunately, the first Crimson line-up imploded at the end of 1969, leaving the uneasy alliance of Fripp and Lake to record In the Wake of Poseidon the following year. This is one of those albums that crops up every now and again that appears to be an almost straight copy of its predecessor. It's a perfectly good album, but it copies In the Court... almost track for track. Fripp took over Mellotron duties officially on the album, with the haunting In The Wake Of Poseidon itself, which bears a distinct resemblance to its predecessor's title track, in feel and structure if not the actual notes and The Devil's Triangle on side two. The latter was close enough to Mars for Holst to sue, had he still been around to do so, but without Crimson Mark 1's awesome power. There are some new sections in the piece, with Fripp playfully messing around with some of the MkII's lesser known sounds, including the guitar, and some of the left-hand manual's rhythms. There's a small amount of subtle 'Tron in Pictures Of A City, too, but I had to have it pointed out to me...

The line-up on ...Poseidon was never going to be a touring unit, so after Lake's departure to the inexplicably vastly popular ELP, Fripp recruited a new set of musicians to record Lizard. A dense, 'difficult' album that still leaves fans divided, it's pretty hard going, to be honest, although there's some great material on it for those who persevere. It's actually one of Crimson's chief 'Tron albums, too, with all but two tracks featuring the instrument. Cirkus was played live by the subsequent Mark 2 lineup, with rasping 'Tron brass on the chorus, a delicate flute melody and layers of strings. The whole of side 2's extended title track has the Mellotron dipping in and out, too, and makes the notoriously 'difficult' album worth working on.

After vocalist Gordon Haskell 'didn't work out' (while there has been considerable acrimony on both sides, they have apparently 'made up' recently), Fripp recruited the now sadly late Boz Burrell, later of Bad Company, considering it worthwhile teaching him to play bass from scratch after being unable to find a suitable bassist. This line-up, generally regarded as 'Crimson Mark 2' toured throughout 1971 before recording Islands, with both Fripp and saxophonist Mel Collins playing new Mellotron M400s. The tapes in these machines consisted of M400 violins (re-EQ'd MkII violins)/cellos, then flutes on one machine and mixed brass B on the other. This brass sound is apparently unique to the M400 and is not the original sound used on the albums up to and including Lizard. (Thanks, indirectly, to Martin Smith for that information). Crimson carried on using these machines until the original band's demise three years later.

Crimson 1972, from 'Live at Jacksonville'

Of the Mark 2 Crimson albums, Islands is probably the least good, although easier to listen to than its predecessor. Formentera Lady is another rather slight ballad in the style of Lizard's Lady Of The Dancing Water, as is The Letters, and Ladies Of The Road is an uncharacteristically macho look at the, er, 'groupie scene', saved by some enormously distorted guitar picking in the chorus and a brief 'Tron flute part. Sailor's Tale is effectively a vehicle for a guitar solo (especially live), leaving the album's highest point to the mournful Prelude: Song Of The Gulls and the title track. Despite the presence of the 'Tron on a few tracks, Islands is no Mellotron Album, and is one of Crimson's least good, too.

This lineup bowed out with the extremely substandard Earthbound, a live album compiled from cassettes recorded straight from the desk. The sound quality is about as you'd expect, and little of the material shines. Peoria is a rather average improv, and Groon is a grossly extended version of Cat Food's b-side, complete with drum solo fed through a VCS3 synth controlled by Hunter Macdonald from the mixing desk, rather as Eno was concurrently doing with labelmates Roxy Music. Earthbound finally achieved an official CD release in 2002, and it sounds like... Earthbound. No bonus tracks, still sounds like crap. Oh well. There are, in fact, several far better recordings of Crimso Mark 2 available, but only through the King Crimson Collector's Club website.

Fripp has admitted that Crimson Mark 2 was 'not so much an improvisational outfit as a jamming band', which is certainly borne out by the audio evidence. As well as Earthbound, there are to date four live King Crimson Collector's Club (see below) releases featuring this line-up. Startlingly, one hour-long CD features no Mellotron whatsoever; coincidentally (possibly...) it's also the least interesting of the three. Their early sets still featured some Mark 1 material, but apart from the ubiquitous 21st Century Schizoid Man, this was replaced by current material as time went on; surprisingly, maybe, this is the only Crimson line-up to have no generally available live recordings [note: no longer true, with the release of Ladies of the Road].

Crimson 1973, from 'The Night Watch'

Fripp dissolved this line-up in mid-'72, realising it was going nowhere. He recruited an entirely new bunch of musicians (again), consisting of the prodigiously talented drummer Bill Bruford from Yes, bassist/vocalist John Wetton, from Family, the very strange Jamie Muir on percussion, and violinist David Cross substituting for a saxophonist, also doubling on keyboards. This line-up is regarded as Crimson's peak by many, the whole ensemble gelling beautifully, quickly writing and recording Larks' Tongues in Aspic, although as Fripp is the first to admit, the studio recordings came nowhere near the onstage power of the material. The best pieces on the album are probably the two parts of the title track, but both Exiles and Easy Money feature loads of 'Tron strings, although again, both were far more powerful live. Nonetheless, a great album, and a suitable debut for the new lineup.

Starless and Bible Black is a bit of a mixed bag, to be honest; much of it is taken (uncredited) from a gig in Amsterdam, plus bits from a couple of other gigs, with edits and overdubs added later, á la Frank Zappa, leaving the album sounding a little disparate. For all that, there's some killer material here; Trio is a beautiful bass/violin/Mellotron flute improv, and the lengthy title track and Fracture are ripping improv pieces from the gig. Songs like Lament, The Great Deceiver and The Night Watch pretty much maintain the quality of the Larks' Tongues material, although the overall feel is definitely less cohesive. Lament and Trio are probably the album's 'Tron highlights, although it's worth buying whatever. Incidentally, The Mincer tends to conjure up images of a huge, grinding machine rampaging across a war-torn landscape etc.etc. Well, it does for me, anyway. Wrong; it was named for an effeminate hanger-on Wetton encountered in LA the previous year. So much for that one.

By the end of Crimson's 1974 US tour, Fripp had had enough, and David Cross was effectively out of the band. The three remaining members recorded Red with various guests, then promptly split, leaving the album as a fitting epitaph to their genius. The title track is an insanely roaring, dissonant instrumental, misinterpreted by many contemporaneous reviewers as 'heavy metal'. Think you missed the point, chaps... Providence is a live improv piece, and Fallen Angel (with some great 'Tron) and the ripping One More Red Nightmare keep up the pressure. The album's (and, contentiously, possibly their entire career's) crowning glory, is Starless. Originally titled Starless And Bible Black, an earlier, failed attempt had been made to record the lengthy piece, and I have to say I'm glad they gave it another go. Of course, they'd already thrown the title away on the previous album and its improv title track, so a compromise was made. Judging by earlier live versions, the studio take tightened up both the melodies and lyrics, turning excellence into perfection. This is one of the all-time 'Tron Classics, with several minutes of stupendously mournful strings carrying the first section, apparently written by Wetton, then reprising at the song's climactic conclusion, repeating its earlier themes over a backing of extraordinary intensity. Terrifyingly brilliant. Incidentally, there has been some debate over whether or not the cellos in Red's title track are Mellotron, as there's no cellist credited, but it seems they're real wattle and daub.

David Cross at the M400, 1974, from 'Live in Mainz'

1975's posthumous USA is a great live album, despite having been tampered with; violin and piano overdubs come courtesy of Eddie Jobson (then of Roxy Music), although Cross' other keyboard work has been left intact. Both the Larks' Tongues 'Tron tracks are present and correct, as is Lament from its follow-up. Exiles is a storming version, with an incredibly intense ending, with both 'Trons set to strings, crapping from a great height onto the studio version, while the album's obligatory improv, Asbury Park, has a string line running through much of it. The (at last! At last!) CD issue adds storming versions of Fracture and Starless, with a brief flute line and some strings in the former and the standard waves of strings in the latter.

After spending the rest of the '70s playing sessions and discovering his spiritual side, in 1980 Fripp formed a band initially known as Discipline, who quickly became King Crimson Mark 4. A brilliant band (best album, 1981's Discipline (*****)), this version of Crimso barely used keyboards, let alone Mellotron, and it wasn't to be heard on a Crimson album again until after another lengthy hiatus, from 1984-93. In the meantime, Fripp started his massive archive programme in 1991, with the release of the 4 CD set Frame By Frame (*****) featuring one disc of unreleased live material, including a stonking version of Mars from 1969, which reappeared on the Epitaph box of a few years later. This set isn't listed above, as it contains nothing that hasn't turned up on subsequent releases.

After the success of Frame By Frame, Fripp got a little bolder with his next archive release, putting out The Great Deceiver, a massive work, filling four CDs to the brim with live Crimson from '73 and '74. There are several complete gigs on offer here, plus extracts from several others, and I have to say that the music is nothing less than superb throughout. OK, so the dodgy nights didn't make it, but the sheer quality of this material is stunning; live versions of nearly everything from that lineup's two albums, plus the early Starless, with some songs having several versions. There's a rare Mark 3 rendering of Peace/Cat Food, a Schizoid Man, an unreleased song, Doctor Diamond, and no less than fifteen improv pieces, including Providence from Red. As you can see, there's Mellotron everywhere you look, including on many of the improvs. Interestingly, The Talking Drum has it on one version but not on the other, a situation that was to crop up with more frequency on the later Collectors Club releases. Anyway, I wouldn't recommend listening to this in one sitting, but it's a killer set, worth every penny. Incidentally, the sleeve notes to this box contains Fripp's witticism/truism that "tuning a Mellotron doesn't". Despite the difficulty of touring two machines, not to mention trying to keep them in tune, the original Crimson persevered with them until the band's demise in 1974.

Crimson swung back into action in '93, releasing the mini-album VROOOM (****) a year later. The following year's THRAK moved the Crimson sound on again, although unlike the '80s version, elements of various previous versions of the band are readily detectable here. Probably the last great Crimson recording (at least to date), THRAK is magnificent, although several of the Belew songs may not appeal to Crimso fans of old. To the surprise of all and sundry, Fripp dragged out one of his old MkII 'Trons (allegedly the In the Court... machine), and it graces several tracks with its presence, though after listening closely, I don't think the strings at the beginning of Dinosaur are Mellotron, although some of the other keyboard work in the song almost certainly is, as is the album's quiet intro before VROOOM kicks in. As a bonus, there are some nice oboes here and there, which earlier Crimson had never really used. There was also a promo video produced showing Fripp playing the MkII during recording, though it's almost certainly a staged shot. And that was it for new Mellotronic Crimson material, sad to say, although, of course, it was five years before another proper new studio album from the band, 2000's ConstruKction of Light (***½).

After the band slowed down again after the '96 tour (this time without actually grinding to a halt), Epitaph - Live 1969 hove into view, this time as a double CD in a box, with the option of buying another two discs of lesser sound quality directly from Fripp's own label, DGM. There's a lot less variety here than on The Great Deceiver, simply because the band were only drawing on one album, plus a few unrecorded pieces. The studio tracks that open the set have been rescued from a ropey off-air tape of the band's sole BBC session, and are worth hearing despite the background noise. Generally, it has to be said that sonically, Epitaph comes nowhere near the quality of The Great Deceiver, but the performances make it all worthwhile, even on discs 3 and 4. A quick glance at the track listing reveals the extended set's major flaw; several versions of almost everything, including five Schizoid Man's, but no I Talk To The Wind. It turns out that there could've been a version on the set, on disc 4, the Chesterfield Jazz Club gig, but apparently the Mellotron was woefully out of tune that night, with its tuning nadir being during that song. As a result, Fripp quietly removed it from the disc despite warning his listening public that the sound quality was 'less than perfect'. We'd have coped...

The next archive release was The Night Watch, otherwise known as the whole of the gig at the Amsterdam Concertgebouw gig from November '73 that was raided for Starless and Bible Black. Heard complete and without its overdubs, it's actually a better album than its offspring, but it's fairly obvious why it couldn't be released in this form at the time. Most of the material will be familiar to the average Crimson fan, but the night's third improv piece The Fright Watch, is a real stormer, well worth the price of admission. Much Mellotron all round, too - recommended. Maybe it's something about early '70s audiences, or maybe it's just the Dutch, but the crowd sound strangely muted; not in a 'not recorded properly' way, more in a 'terribly polite theatre audience' way. Applause but no cheers. Weird.

The following year, Fripp decided to dive headlong into the archive market by starting the DGM (later King Crimson) Collectors Club, a subscription-only series of releases from the band's history, reviewed here.

Oh God; where to start summing-up? Crimson have released easily the most (confirmed) Mellotron Albums of anyone on this site, and most of them are worth hearing. If you're into the whole Prog Thing you should already own most of their '70s releases, at least, but from a Mellotronic viewpoint I'd say the essentials are: In the Court, Poseidon, Lizard, Larks' Tongues, Starless and Bible Black, Red and USA, to which you can add Epitaph, The Great Deceiver and The Night Watch. All the relevant Club releases are worth hearing, which really only leaves Islands, Earthbound and THRAK as (Mellotronically) non-essential, though I'm sure some of you will disagree. Oh, bollocks to it; buy 'em all. See if I care.

Sadly, in 1997 Robert Fripp announced on his website his decision to sell all five of his Mellotrons. Bidding is still taking place on some machines at the time of writing, with ridiculous figures being bandied about, especially for the In the Court... MkII. It would seem that the individual instruments' provenance counts for more than their potential. Let's hope that they are bought by musicians rather than collectors who will probably squirrel them away as museum pieces. Note: they were never sold, as Robert apparently received no 'suitable' bids.

Incidentally, after the 1974 split, John Wetton remained a 'Tron fan for a few years, playing one with Phil Manzanera and Uriah Heep, among others. In recent years, he's been heard to play Starless on stage, often using IQ's Martin Orford, himself an ex-'Tron owner. They generally only use samples, although their appearance at Progfest '95 featured the real thing, but when push comes to shove, samples are better than no 'Tron at all...

interviews

An interview snippet:

Back to the topic of 'so did Fripp play 'Tron on the first album or not?' Here's an interview segment with engineer Geoff Workman on the subject:

Asked if recording an instrument as notoriously quirky as a Mellotron posed special problems, Workman replies:

"Not really. We used to take them DI because the early models like they used in King Crimson and in the Moody Blues were so noisy. The later ones were smaller and quieter and had interchangeable racks of tapes and various other features. But these first ones were so noisy that if you put them through any kind of amp pre to getting to the console, you didn't have a signal-to-noise ratio, you had a noise-to-signal ratio! You'd hear this great, 'Shhhhhhh' all through it. 'Wait, I think there's a little string part in the background of all that noise!'"

"One of the things that was interesting about Crimson is that they often used two Mellotrons at the same time; both McDonald and Fripp would play them. The thing about the Mellotron is the tape loop [sic.] lasts just shy of eight seconds, so if a chord needs to be held down for more than eight seconds, you have to lift your hands off and let the springs pull the tape back so the loop can start again. So on songs that needed more sustained chords we'd use two, with one player holding the chord for seven seconds or so and then the other coming in to keep it going - we used to call it 'duelling Mellotron'".

So! Proof? I wouldn't like to argue with the redoubtable Mr. Workman, but I've never heard this story anywhere else. Unless you know better...

bootlegs

Er... Are you sure? There've been plenty of '69-'74 Crimso boots available over the years, but given that Robert seems to've released almost every note they ever played live in his Collectors' Club series, the point of tracking down anything he's (so far) missed escapes me. You can be quite certain that, apart from maybe the odd improv, every live Mellotron track they ever played has now been officially documented, mostly multiple times, so I'm afraid that, unless someone wishes to point me to something genuinely relevant, the subject is closed.

Here's Easy Money on US telly, '73.

Starless on French TV, 1974.

links

Official King Crimson site

See: Collectors' Club releases | Giles, Giles & Fripp | John Wetton | Trey Gunn Band | 21st Century Schizoid Band | Emerson, Lake & Palmer | The Letters


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